5 Simple yet effective marketing lessons you can apply to your brand

1.Deliver Simplicity
Digital brings more complexity — and opportunity — to marketing than ever before.
With more information comes more confusion, and people are craving help. People don’t just want a brand; they want a trusted adviser, one that can cut out complexity and deliver clarity. Your message should tell a great story that is simple enough to drives real business result

2. Do a retrospect
When marketers or business owners take a step back to survey what’s working (and what’s not), both behind their own business’s doors and around the industry, they can get a better idea of where they should be investing their time and resources. It just takes a willingness to learn, evolve, and adapt to areas where growth is strong. Research will tell you that specific, tailored marketing is much more effective than trying to achieve mass appeal.
So it’s important to understand how the channels and cost translates to customer acquisition and retention at the end of the day

3. Your marketing must be forward thinking:
You must invest in ways to protect and strengthen your relationships with customers, ultimately creating a brand that will endure. In this new era of personal primetimes, the job of a marketer is to grab people’s attention from the jump. One key thing we need to point out is that all marketing should be performance marketing

4. Unify your data source
Connecting your systems and organizing sources of information can help you identify valuable insights about your customers and better respond to their needs. Once you understands your customer and can effectively satisfy their needs or desires, you are elevated from your competitors.

5. Measure what matters
Rather than anchoring to specific key performance indicators (KPIs), orient your marketing objectives around business growth so that you focus on the metrics that matter. This is one of the reasons why analytics should even in the simplest form should be part of what your business leverages on.

Measure metrics that are in line with your business objectives and revisit them frequently to determine two things:
I. Does it have a downstream impact on our top or bottom line?
II. Does it help the customer? If a metric doesn’t meet either of these requirements, it is not nearly as important to us.”

You can share perspective of what has helped you on your own journey or from afar.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

× Get a free service here